You know how sometimes you spend 90 minutes playing a game from start to finish, put it down, and know it’s going to stick with you? Yeah, Virtual Virtual Reality just did that for me, and I can’t give enough praise for it as a piece of weird, creepy, surreal, powerful work of surrealist art.

Virtual Virtual Reality is a VR game in which you play a human, tasked with donning VR headsets and completing various tasks for AI constructs who take on the forms of inanimate objects, and make bizarre semi human requests of you. Their requests are all based on recreating or experiencing aspects of human existance, like cooking toast or watching a sunset or causing a tumble weed to tumble along on its merry way. You put virtual reality headsets on within ever deepening layers of VR, going down a rabbit hole leading to a story that feels incredibly reminiscent of Portal in terms of the way it presents a powerful AI, a polished veneer of perfection, and clearly something sinister going on behind the scenes.

Virtual Virtual Reality isn’t the most complex game out there mechanically, you mainly walk around 3D spaces, moving things around with your hands, but the constantly well written dialogue, the reactions to your actions, and the ways in which you break the game world around you and go beyond its presented limits really go a long way to making this one of my favourite stand alone narrative experiences in VR right now.

Seriously, when I compare the writing and tone to Portal, and say nothing more specific, that’s a testiment to how much I enjoyed this narrative, and how little I want to ruin it. I’ll say that it makes some very timely observations about capitalism and those who profit from it, as well as living in capitalism itself, but beyond that I’d just recommend playing it.

It costs around £10, and it lasts around 90 minutes or so, maybe closer to two hours, but it’s great. If you own a VR headset that supports room scale, pick this up. I don’t often give reccomendations this vague, but seriously, just play it.